Is High Blood Pressure Medication Considered a Blood Thinner?

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Many people take a blood pressure pill and a blood thinner. As a cardiac nurse, I get asked this question frequently: “Is high blood pressure medication considered a blood thinner”?

The short answer is no. Blood thinners and high blood pressure medications are in two different classes of medications.

Blood Pressure Classifications

Blood pressure medications are designed to decrease your blood pressure. Types of blood pressure medications:

  • ACE inhibitors.
  • Angiotensin II receptor blockers.
  • Thiazide diuretics. 
  • Calcium channel blockers.
  • Beta-blockers.
  • Alpha-blockers.
Is High Blood Pressure Medication Considered a Blood Thinner?

Blood Thinner Names

  • Apixaban (Eliquis)
  • Dabigatran (Pradaxa)
  • Edoxaban (Savaysa)
  • Fondaparinux (Arixtra)
  • Heparin (Fragmin, Innohep, and Lovenox)
  • Rivaroxaban (Xarelto)
  • Warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven)

Is High Blood Pressure Medication Considered a Blood Thinner?

Now there are some blood pressure medications that will affect your platelet count. Lasix is a diuretic but it is often used alongside blood pressure meds. Lasix will cause low platelets. When you have low platelets, your clot will not clot as fast.

Conclusion

High blood pressure medications are not considered blood thinners. However, just be aware that some blood pressure medications will decrease your platelets. You know platelets are what helps your blood clot appropriately.

Any questions you should confer with your prescribing doctor.

Scientific Citations

https://medlineplus.gov/bloodthinners.html

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Phyllis Robinson MSN, RN is a Registered Nurse of 27 years. Phyllis is passionate about the prevention and healing of heart disease using traditional and alternative methods. She has experience in emergency room, telemetry, infusion, and critical care. Phyllis currently practices in an intensive care unit.

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About Phyllis Robinson MSN, RN

Phyllis Robinson MSN, RN is a Registered Nurse of 27 years. Phyllis is passionate about the prevention and healing of heart disease using traditional and alternative methods. She has experience in emergency room, telemetry, infusion, and critical care. Phyllis currently practices in an intensive care unit.

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Methyldopa (Aldomet): What a Nurse Needs to Know

What Are the Consequences of Thiamine Deficiency

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